Interviews and other media

Democracy, Time and Climate Change. An Interview with Frederic Hanusch.

Democracy, Time and Climate Change

Frederic Hanusch

Frederic Hanusch did his Dr. phil. as part of the research group “Democracy and Climate Change” at the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities in Essen (KWI). He worked from 2013-2016 at the German Advisory Council on Global Change (WBGU) and has since 2016 been a part of the project “Futurisation of Politics” at the IASS, the Institute for Advances Sustainability Studies at Potsdam. His research is focused on a combination of democracy research, global change research and the study of time. His most recent publication is Democracy and Climate Change (2017) published in the Routledge Global Cooperation Series.

Tropic of Chaos. An Interview with Dr. Christian Parenti.

Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence​

CHRISTIAN PARENTI​

Christian Parenti has a PhD in sociology (co-supervised in geography) from the London School of Economics and is a professor in the Global Liberal Studies Program at New York University. His latest book, Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (2011), explores how climate change is already causing violence as it interacts with the legacies of economic neoliberalism and cold-war militarism. The book involved several years of travel and research in conflict zones of the Global South. 

Christian’s current research focuses on the environmental history of state involvement in American economic development, from the earliest days of the republic onward. As a journalist, he has reported extensively from Afghanistan, Iraq, and various parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. His articles have appeared in Fortune, The Washington Post, The New York Times, Middle East Report, London Review of Books, Mother Jones, and The Nation (where he is a contributing editor). He has also helped make several documentaries and has won numerous journalistic awards, including the 2009 Lange-Tailor Prize and “Best Magazine Writing 2008” from the Society for Professional Journalists. He also received a 2009 Emmy nomination for the documentary Fixer: The Taking of Ajmal Naqshbandi.

Professor Gudni Elisson interviews Michael E. Mann about his research in general, the ideological attacks on the hockey stick graph, the disinformation campain by the denial industry and the nature of true scientific skepticism. How do we explain the scientific consensus and how should we talk to those who deny the evidence and approach the topic from an ideological standpoint?

In the Crosshairs of History:
Michael E. Mann and the Denial Industry

Michael Mann

In this Earth101 interview Michael E. Mann talks about his research in general, the ideological attacks on the hockey stick graph, the disinformation campain by the denial industry and the nature of true scientific skepticism. How do we explain the scientific consensus and how should we talk to those who deny the evidence and approach the topic from an ideological standpoint?

Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

Dr. Mann received his Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University. His research involves the use of theoretical models and observational data to better understand Earth’s climate system. He was a Lead Author on the Observed Climate Variability and Change chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report in 2001 and was organizing committee chair for the National Academy of Sciences Frontiers of Science in 2003. He has received a number of honors including NOAA’s outstanding publication award in 2002. He contributed, with other IPCC authors, to the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was awarded the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2012 and the National Conservation Achievement Award for science by the National Wildlife Federation in 2013. He made Bloomberg News list of fifty most influential people in 2013.

Dr. Mann is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is author of more than 190 peer-reviewed and edited publications and has published the books Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change and The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines. He is also a co-founder of the award-winning science website RealClimate.org.

Professor Gudni Elisson interviews Stefan Rahmstorf  about his research on global sea level rise, the role of plantary waves in the atmosphere in relation to extreme weather events and the weakening of the Gulf Stream System in the North Atlantic. He also discusses the scientific consensus and the role of the denial industry in establishing doubt. Finally Rahmstorf talks about the role of the Paris Agreement in 2015, why we need to aim higher if we want to keep global temperature increase well below 2°C, and the catastrophic problems we will be faced with if we fail to do so.

INTERVIEW 2016 – QUESTIONS OF STABILITY

Stefan Rahmstorf

Climate scientist Stefan Rahmstorf talks about his research on global sea level rise, the role of plantary waves in the atmosphere in relation to extreme weather events and the weakening of the Gulf Stream System in the North Atlantic. He also discusses the scientific consensus and the role of the denial industry in establishing doubt. Finally Rahmstorf talks about the role of the Paris Agreement in 2015, why we need to aim higher if we want to keep global temperature increase well below 2°C, and the catastrophic problems we will be faced with if we fail to do so.

Stefan Rahmstorf obtained his PhD in oceanography at Victoria University of Wellington in 1990. He has worked as a scientist at the New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, at the Institute of Marine Science in Kiel and since 1996 at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. His work focuses on the role of the oceans in climate change.

In 1999 Rahmstorf was awarded the $ 1 million Centennial Fellowship Award of the US-based James S. McDonnell foundation. Since 2000 he teaches Physics of the Oceans as a professor at Potsdam University. Rahmstorf served from 2004–2013 in the German Advisory Council on Global Change (WBGU) and was one of the lead authors of the 4th IPCC Assessment Report.

Dr. Rahmstorf has published over 100 scientific papers (30 in leading journals such as Nature, Science and PNAS) and co-authored four books. Available in English are Our Threatened Oceans (2009, with Katherine Richardson) and The Climate Crisis (2010, with David Archer).

Þóra Arnórsdóttir interviews climatologist Michael E. Mann.

RÚV Intervies

Michael E. mann

Þóra Arnórsdóttir interviews climatologist Michael E. Mann on the scientific consensus, global warming denialism, and the future threats we are facing. The interview was aired on November 18th, 2013, at RUV, Iceland’s National Television Station.

Þóra Arnórsdóttir interviews climatologist Stefan Rahmstorf.

RÚV Interview

Stefan Rahmstorf

Þóra Arnórsdóttir interviews climatologist Stefan Rahmstorf on the climate crisis and the Fifth IPCC Assessment Report. The interview was aired on October 8th, 2013, at RUV, Iceland’s National Television Station.

Professor Gudni Elisson interviews Mike Berners-Lee.

Interview

Mike Berners-lee

Professor Gudni Elisson interviews Mike Berners-Lee. Mike is the author of How Bad are Bananas? The Carbon Footprint of Everything (2010) and with Duncan Clark he wrote The Burning Question: We can’t burn half the world’s oil, coal and gas. So how do we quit? (2013).

Professor Guðni Elísson interviews Karen Pinkus, professor of Italian and Comparative Literature at Cornell University.

Interview

Karen pinkus

Karen Pinkus, professor of Italian and Comparative Literature at Cornell University, is a member of the Advisory Board of the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future and a member of the Atkinson Center Climate Change Focus Group. Karen has published widely in Italian culture, literary theory, cinema, visual theory, and environmental theory. Karen has become ever more convinced that the humanities—critical theory—must play a role in confronting what is the most wicked problem humans have faced. But humanists, she argues, are precisely misunderstood. They are often viewed as either “artists” (“you can create works to raise awareness of what is happening and appeal to emotions”) or “journalists” (“you can help translate our difficult science into legible prose to get people to act”) or “behaviorists” (“you can explain why people act the way they do and get them to change.”). In contrast, Karen advocates for the impractical humanities, for thinking about anthropogenic climate change as unique, not just another environmental issue, and not one that we can solve with better technology inserted into the same paradigms.

Professor Guðni Elísson interviews Erick Fernandes.

Interview

Erick fernandes

Erick Fernandes is an Adviser on Agriculture, Forestry & Climate Change at the World Bank and Co-Led the Bank’s Global Expert Team for Adaptation to Climate Change (GET-CCA). Erick is from a Kenya and grew up in the arid lands of northern Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia. He holds a PhD in Soil Science from North Carolina State University. Prior to joining the Bank he was an International Professor of Crop and Soil Sciences at Cornell University with research and teaching programs on tropical agroecosystems, hydrosheds, and natural resources. He served as the Global Coordinator of the GEF-UNDP-CGIAR program on Alternatives to Slash and Burn Agriculture (ASB) and was a Principle Investigator in the NASA-sponsored, Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA-Eco) program.

Professor Guðni Elísson interviews Gavin Schmidt.

Interview

Gavin Schmidt

Gavin Schmidt began his career at NASA GISS in 1996, and is now Director. His primary area of research is the development and evaluation of computer simulations of the Earth’s climate, and is particularly interested in how they can be used to inform decision-making. Schmidt received a doctorate in applied mathematics from University College London in 1994. In addition to more than 100 published, peer-reviewed articles, he is the co-author of Climate Change: Picturing the Science (W.W. Norton, 2009), a collaboration between climate scientists and photographers. In 2011, he was awarded the inaugural American Geophysical Union Climate Communications Prize.

Professor Guðni Elísson interviews Kevin Anderson.

Interview

Kevin anderson

Kevin Anderson is professor of energy and climate change in the School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. Anderson recently finished a two-year position as director of the Tyndall Centre, the UK’s leading academic climate change research organisation. Kevin’s work makes clear that there is now little to no chance of maintaining the rise in global mean surface temperature at below 2C, despite repeated high-level statements to the contrary. Moreover, it demonstrates how avoiding even a 4C rise demands a radical reframing of both the climate change agenda and the economic characterisation of contemporary society.

Professor Guðni Elísson interviews Erik M. Conway.

Interview

EriK M. conway

Erik M. Conway is a historian of science and technology residing in Pasadena, CA, currently employed by the California Institute of Technology. He studies and documents the history of space exploration, and examines the intersections of space science, Earth science, and technological change. Conway has co-authored two books with Naomi Oreskes on climate change, the Merchants of Doubt (2010), concerning the deliberate misrepresentation of climate change by a few high-level scientists, and The Collapse of ‘Western’ Civilization (2014), a science-based work of fiction that gives a critique of our present time from a future perspective.

Professor Guðni Elísson interviews Francis Dobbs.

Interview

Francis Dobbs

Francis Dobbs is the Head of the World Bank Film Unit in Washington, DC. He is a British citizen who worked in UK television and independent film production before moving to the World Bank Group media division 25 years ago. At the World Bank he ran a small production unit producing a variety of videos on development issues and television documentary co-productions, before joining Connect4Climate to undertake communications projects on climate change and climate action.

Radio interviews

RÚV Interview

Kevin anderson

(only in Icelandic)
 
Líkurnar á því að meðalhlýnun á jörðinni verði fari ekki yfir tvær gráður á Celsius á öldinni eru mjög litlar. Líkurnar eru miklu meiri á hlýnunin verði fjórar til sex gráður með afar alvarlegum afleiðingum.
 

Þetta segir Kevin Anderson prófessor í orku og loftslagsmálum við háskólann í Manchester og aðstoðarforstjóri Tyndall rannsóknarstofnunarinnar í loftslagsmálum við háskólann í Austur Anglíu í Englandi. Hann flutti fyrirlestur um loftslagsmál við Háskóla Íslands í dag. Ef okkur er alvara með að halda hlýnuninni í skefjum, halda henni innan tveggja gráða þá vitum við alveg hvað þarf að gera og vitum að við þurfum að bregðast við fljótt. Okkur eru ekki gefnir neinir frestir segir Kevin Anderson. 

Tvennt blasir við segir hann.  Við vitum að við ráðum ekki enn yfir þeirri tækni sem þarf til að draga stórlega úr losun, og þess vegna þurfum við að draga stórlega úr eftirspurn eftir orku, sem hefur í för með sér losun gróðurhúsalofttegunda. Samtímis þarf að efla rannsóknir og þróun annarra orkugjafa. Þegar ég geng um götur Reykjavíkur sé ég að Íslendingar eru mjög hrifnir af stórum og öflugum bílum. Ég sé líka að litlir bílar spjara sig vel þótt færðin sé eins og hún er. Íslendingar geta dregið úr eftirspurn eftir óhreinni orku með því að aka um á sparneytnari bílum. Hér er eitt dæmi um að auðveldlega er unnt að draga úr losuninni og hún á auðvitað ekki bara við um Ísland.  

Anderson þekkir vel umræðuna um það hvort nýta eigi allar tiltækar olíu og gaslindir jarðarinnar, eða hvort nauðsynlegt sé að láta staðar numið.
Þessi umræða á sér ekki bara stað í Noregi og á Íslandi. Í Bretlandi er mikil umræða um hvort eigi að nýta nýfundnar gaslindir. Mitt svar er það, segir hann að ef við brennum allt jarðefnaeldsneyti sem við þekkjum jafngilsir það því að brenna jörðina. Við sem störfum í þessum rannsóknum höfum  komist að þeirri niðurstöðu að við megum í mesta lagi brenna fimmtungi af þeim þekktum en ónýttum olíu og gasbirgðum sem við eigum, ef við ætlum að eiga möguleika á að ná markmiðinu um tveggja gráðu hlýnun. En hvernig myndi hann lýsa afleiðingum fjögurra gráðu hlýnunar? 
Fyrir okkur sem búum á Bretlandi eða Íslandi hljómar það ekki sérstaklega illa að að hlýni um fjórar gráður. Við gætum alveg lifað við  það. En við erum að tala um meðalhlýnun á jörðinni og hlýnunin verður mest næst skautunum og á lægri breiddargráðum þar sem býr mikill mannfjöldi og jafnframt fátækast hluti mannkyns. Hafa ber einnig í huga að þegar við tölum fjögurra gráða meðalhlýnun þá erum við að tala um allan hnöttinn. Höfin hlýna hægar en land, og þetta þýðir að hlýnunin á landi gæti orðið sex til átta gráður. Það er meira en við erum tilbúin að takast á við og afleiðingarnar yrðu hrikalegar, meðal annars fyrir uppskeru og matvælaframleiðslu og heimi þar sem ör  mannfjölgun er stór vandi. Anderson minnir á hitabylgjuna í Evrópu árið tvö þúsund og þrjú sem kostaði tuttugu til þrjátíu þúsund manns lífið. 

Slíkar náttúrlegar sveiflur ofan á hlýnunina eru þegar orðnar illviðráðanlega, hvað þá ef þær leggjast ofan á loftslag sem er orðið fjögurra til átta gráðum hlýrra en nú er.  Við sæjum breytingar á öllum sviðum, aðgangi að vatni, við fengjum hærra sjávarborð, breytt úrkomumynstur, breyttar og öfgafyllri sveiflur í veðri, í stuttu máli breytingar sem yrðu afdrifaríkari en svo að samfélög okkar geti lagað sig að því sem koma skal á þeim stutta tíma sem er til stefnu.

Þetta er hrikaleg framtíð sem við erum að búa afkomendum okkar og við búum þeim hana vitandi vits. Við vitum um þessar afleiðingar af athöfnum okkar,  að við höfum hingað til ákveðið að gera ekki það sem við vitum að við verðum að gera segir Kevin Anderson, sem sjálfur reynir að axla persónulega ábyrgð með athöfnum sínum. Hann flýgur til dæmis ekki milli staða þegar hann fer í fyrirlestraferðir, heldur ferðast með lestum eða siglir. Til Íslands kom hann til dæmis með Brúarfossi og segir það hafa verið mikið ævintýri að upplifa Norður Atlandshafið í svo úfnum vetrarham.

Orginally posted here.

RÚV Interview

Guðni elísson

(Only in Icelandic)
 
Guðni Elísson, forseti Íslensku og menningardeildar Háskóla Íslands segir í Sjónmáli í dag frá fyrirlestri Chris Mooney sem haldinn verður laugardaginn 7. september 2013. Fyrirlesturinn heitir Sálfræðin sem býr að baki stríðinu gegn umhverfisvísindunum, en Mooney hefur skrifað um stöðu vísinda í samtímanum. 
 
Birtist fyrst föstudaginn 6. september 2013.

RÚV Interview

Marteinn Sindri Jónsson fjallar um fyrirlestur Chris Mooney

(Only in Icelandic)

Bandaríski blaðamaðurinn Chris Mooney hefur í bókum sínum varpað fram áleitnum spurningum um stöðu vísindanna í samtímanum og afstöðu stjórnmálanna til þeirra. Mooney hélt fyrirlestur í Háskóla Íslands laugardaginn 7. september og í Sjónmáli mánudaginn 9. september 2013 var sagt frá efni fyrirlestrarins. Marteinn Sindri Jónsson heimspekingur og útvarpsmaður fór á fyrirlestur Mooneys og segir frá.

RÚV Interview

Loftslagsumræða í víðsjá 2013

(Only in Icelandic)

Nokkrir þekktustu sérfræðingar samtímans á sviði loftslagsvísinda eru staddir hér á landi um þessar mundir og taka meðal annars þátt í málþinginu Loftslagsvísindin og loftslagsumræðan sem fram fer í Háskóla Íslands á morgun.

Eðlis- og loftslagsfræðingurinn Michael Mann og loftslags-og haffræðingurinn Stefan Ramsdof flytja erindi á málþinginu og það sama má segja um umhverfisbloggarann Peter Sinclair, félagsfræðinginn Kari Norgaard og Guðna Elísson bókmenntafræðing. Víðsjá er í dag tileinkuð loftslagsmálum og munu þau þrjú síðastnefndu, Peter Sinclair, Kari Norgaard og Guðni Elísson segja frá í þættinum.

Originally posted here.

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