Trailers and Shorts

 

Micahel E. Mann talks about the book he did with Washington Post editorial cartoonist Tom Toles. They target the ongoing campaign to deny the climate change threat through satire and where appropriate, ridicule, built around Tom Toles’ famously insightful, edgy, and provocative climate-themed cartoons.

Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

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Natural climate changes in Earth’s history have been accompanied by huge sea-level changes: After the last Ice Age, global sea levels rose by 120 meters. We still have enough ice on Earth to raise sea levels by a further over 60 meters. How stable are these huge ice masses in the face of global warming?

Stefan Rahmstorf obtained his PhD in oceanography at Victoria University of Wellington in 1990. He has worked as a scientist at the New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, at the Institute of Marine Science in Kiel and since 1996 at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. His work focuses on the role of the oceans in climate change.

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Sea-level rise is one of the inevitable results of global warming, as warmer ocean waters expand and land ice melts and adds water to the oceans. Observations show that the seas are indeed rising and that the rise in the 20th century is unique in the context of the previous millennia. However, more difficult to answer is the question of how fast and how far sea level will rise in the future. The billion-dollar-question is: How stable are the ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica?

Stefan Rahmstorf obtained his PhD in oceanography at Victoria University of Wellington in 1990. He has worked as a scientist at the New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, at the Institute of Marine Science in Kiel and since 1996 at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. His work focuses on the role of the oceans in climate change.

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Humans have had to cope with extreme weather events throughout their history. However, the data show that the number of certain types of extreme events is on the rise in recent decades. For some types of extremes, such as heat waves, droughts and extreme rainfall events, this is an expected outcome of global warming. Other consequences have surprised climate researchers, such as changes in the jet stream and planetary waves in the atmosphere that have been linked to some unprecedented recent extreme events.

Stefan Rahmstorf obtained his PhD in oceanography at Victoria University of Wellington in 1990. He has worked as a scientist at the New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, at the Institute of Marine Science in Kiel and since 1996 at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. His work focuses on the role of the oceans in climate change.

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A slowdown or even collapse of the Gulf Stream System as a result of global warming has long been a concern of climate scientists and has fuelled the imagination of Hollywood. Regular direct observations of this giant ocean current system do not go back far enough to tell whether there is any long-term trend. However, in recent years indirect evidence is mounting for a remarkable slowdown over the 20th Century.

Stefan Rahmstorf obtained his PhD in oceanography at Victoria University of Wellington in 1990. He has worked as a scientist at the New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, at the Institute of Marine Science in Kiel and since 1996 at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. His work focuses on the role of the oceans in climate change.

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How Close Are We to Dangerous Warming of the Planet? A discussion of the concept of “equilibrium climate sensitivity”, what it tells us about future global warming, and the efforts we need to make to avoid catastrophic warming of the planet.

Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

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A discussion of the common but false claim by climate change contrarians that global warming has “stopped” or “paused”. In fact, global warming continues unabated, with record global temperatures have occurred several years in a row now.

Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

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The film The Root of the Problem: Iceland and Climate Change, made by Jón Bragi Pálsson, is a 30 minute documentary about the discourse of climate change in Iceland. The film targets solutions that are based on consumption and the idea that global warming is a positive thing for Icelanders. The documentary gives insight into the dilemma of living everyday life in a consumer’s world while dealing with the serious problems of global warming. It is based on interviews with scientist and professors in the field of climate change. The documentary is currently in production, but will be out this summer.